Sweet-and-sour spare ribs 糖醋排骨

Sweet-and-sour spare ribs 糖醋排骨

Just as Ms. Dunlop stated in the headnote, sweet-and-sour ribs are not difficult to make, but they do take a little time because the recipe has several stages.

I didn’t deep-fry the spare ribs since it was an optional step. I thought the ribs turned out to be perfectly tasty without the frying. The ribs were tender, with a slightly crispy outer layer. The sauce was sweet an tangy, and will make you want to lick your fingers.

Husband normally doesn’t like any “sweet” dishes. But he actually liked this one, and had quite a few pieces.

(p.58)

Chicken livers with Chinese chives 韭菜炒雞肝

Chicken livers with Chinese chives 韭菜炒雞肝

I like eating liver, especially in yakitori restaurant. But cooking liver scares me.

Very very long time ago, I attempted to cook pig liver once. When I cut into the liver on the cutting board, blood came out of it. A LOT of blood. The blood dripped all over the countertop. I tried to grab napkins. But the blood had already dripped down the counter and created a pool of blood on the ground. I was horrified. I had no idea there were blood inside of the liver, and never knew a liver could hold that much blood. That was my first attempt to cook liver, and also the last.

In the headnote, Fuchsia stated that she adapted the recipe using chicken liver instead of pig liver from a dish she’s had in China. I was really glad to read that. I saw fresh chicken liver in the supermarket today. So I thought I would just try to conquer this dish tonight.

I sliced the chicken liver, and no blood came out! Phew. That was a lot easier than I expected.

The finished dish was surprisingly good. I added 1 teaspoon ground chillies, and that added tons of heat, in a really good way. The liver was very tender. The Chinese chives had soaked up all the seasoning. It tasted great with some rice. And for some reason, I wanted to have a glass of beer with this dish.

(p.126)

Chinese cabbage with vinegar 醋溜白菜

Chinese cabbage with vinegar 醋溜白菜

I’ve had spicy cabbage with vinegar in Szechuan restaurant before. I like the crunchiness of the cabbage and the spicy-vinegary flavor. But I’ve never had it with Chinese cabbage before.

Chinese cabbage is softer than cabbage, and it is also juicier. The thicker part of the cabbage was still slightly crunchy, while the leafy part was soft. The contrasting texture of the vegetable was nice. We also enjoyed the slightly vinegary flavor. It made me want to just keep on eating more and more of it.

(p.184)